Self-fulfilling Prophecy


Self-fulfilling Prophecy is an interesting topic in social psychology. Our first impression of someone may shape the way we treat that person—which, in turn, may influence his or her actual behavior. This process is known as a self-fulfilling prophecy. These are predictions that make themselves come true. We so much believe it be to true that we make it happen with our expectations and attitude. It is not just an interpersonal process, it might take place in the intergroup or collective level as well.

In a classic illustration of this phenomenon, in 1968 American psychologists Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson told a group of elementary school teachers that certain students were on the verge of an intellectual growth spurt (in fact, these students were randomly chosen from their classes). By the end of the school year, these designated students—who had received more positive attention from the teachers—actually had higher average test scores than their peers.

I often hear an alarming statement related to the future of Nepal that it is dark and it is hopeless, there is no future in this country. Politics is all messed up and nothing is in right order. I think these kind of thoughts and attitude could result in self-fulfilling prophecy.We need hope and aspirations, we need positive thoughts and vigorous action to change this kind of attitude. The social state is quite pessimistic at the moment, there is no education and employment for youth in this country. It is tough but this could help us to motivate ourselves to build better and prosperous country.

I like this stanza in Daughtry’s song called Home:

Be careful what you wish for,
‘Cause you just might get it all.
You just might get it all,
And then some you don’t want.
Be careful what you wish for,
‘Cause you just might get it all.
You just might get it all, yeah.

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