Call for Abstracts: IMHCN 2017


Call for Abstracts

The Organizing Committee of International Mental Health Conference Nepal 2017 (IMHCN2017) invites mental health and allied professionals, practitioners, researchers, academicians, NGOs, INGOs, service users, and students to contribute scientific papers, posters, or symposia related to the conference theme “Coming together for mental health”in the following areas:

1. Promotion of mental health

2. Prevention of mental illness

3. Treatment & Rehabilitation of people with mental illness

We would like to encourage all to present any research/work done in the field of mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) in the form of Paper or Poster presentations.

Submissions may be in the form of Open Papers or Scientific Poster Presentation

Open Papers (OP) — Presentation of data reflecting an individual study or idea that is not part of a symposium. The organizing committee will place the OP into related themes. Each theme will last for 60-90 minutes, but individual papers should aim to be no more than 8-10 minutes with a five minute question time at the end.

Poster Presentation (PP) — graphic representations of the results of empirical/conceptual/ organization work put on display by individual/group of delegates and open for questioning or discussion by those interested.

Abstracts in standard format should be e-mailed to imhcn@gmail.com Last date for submission is August 15, 2017.

All selected abstracts will be published in the Conference Souvenir.

Submission Guidelines & Procedures:

1. Abstracts must be submitted via e-mail to imhcn@gmail.com by August 15, 2017.

2. Abstracts must be written in ENGLISH only, and should not exceed 250 words (Not including title, authors, key-words and affiliations).

3. Abstracts must be in text format, DO NOT include any graphs, tables or images.

4. You must indicate whether you wish to have your abstract considered for OPEN PAPERS (OP) or POSTER PRESENTATION (PP).

5. Please provide the presenter’s brief biography in no more than 200 words.

6. Abstracts of scientific research must be submitted using the designated field: Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion and Conclusion. We only accept abstracts related to the conference theme.

7. Abstract should be typed in Times New Roman font, size 12 with 1.5 line spacing.

8. Accepted abstracts are eligible for presentation after receiving full registration fee from the author/ presenter. If registration fee of the presenter is not received by due date, his/her paper is assumed to have been withdrawn. Once the abstract is submitted, changes, correction or rewording are not allowed. The submission should be carefully proof-read and corrected by the author. Individual authors are responsible for the accuracy of the information supplied, as accepted abstracts will be printed on the Conference Souvenir.

9. All Abstracts will be reviewed by the Scientific Committee. Only those abstracts judged to be of high quality and of relevance will be accepted. Acceptance notification will be sent to the first submitting author and presenter with further instructions. Final presentation style will be subject to the decision of the Scientific Committee.

10. Failure to comply with these requirements will exclude the abstract from consideration.

IMPORTANT DATES:

Call for abstracts open

01 June 2017

Abstract submission deadline

15 August 2017

Acceptance notification

05 September 2017

Registration deadlines for presenters

30 September 2017

Conference dates

16 & 17 November 2017

About-IMHCN2017.pdf

Call for abstracts-IMHCN2017.pdf

The organizing committee compromises of academic institution and different I/NGOs such as Dept. of Psychiatry- TUTH, UMN, CMC, TPO, Koshish, Americares and ACF.

Hateymalo (2010-16)


Public Resources in one place

md_cover-misssing-family-report-2009 2009 – Families of missing persons in Nepal: a study of their needs PDF: families-of-missing-persons-nepal-report

This assessment conducted by Simon Robbins was a stepping stone for the launch of Hateymalo program in Nepal.

hateymalo-brochure

2010 – Hateymalo: Accompanying families of the missing in Nepal. Piloted in Bardiya by Bhava Poudyal, Nepalese Psychologist and the team of ICRC colleagues which expanded to altogether 46 districts of Nepal in successive four phases.

 

2013 – Release of Don’t go so far documentary. Directed by Arnaud Galent.

2016 – Completion of the program & Final Dissemination Products (Reports , Documentaries & Photobook). In collaboration of Yubaraj Adhikari, Rupa Chaudhary, Bishnu Waiba, Juthi Ram Chaudhari, Kalu Ram Chaudhari, Purna Shova Maharjan, Bina Chaudhary, Sujen Man Maharjan and ICRC colleagues of various departments, Nepal Red Cross Society district chapters and local NGOs.

619971-hateymalo_accompaniment_report

hateymalo_accompaniment_report (ENGLISH),  hateymalo_accompaniment_report_in_nepali (NEPALI),

commemorating_the_missing (photobook)

 

Documentary:

 

SLC ko Khusi


Just as I am about to start a new day in my office, didi comes with a pack of sweets (laddu) and share it with me. It is a tradition in our office to distribute chocolates and sweets to colleagues when somebody comes from aboard or there is some good news. So, I ask her who is it from and what is the occasion? She says one of the colleague’s daughter has passed SLC with A+ grade and to share that good news he has sent us the sweets.

Yes, School Leaving Certificate examinations (SLC) results were finally out yesterday, hundred of thousands of students from all over the country, their parents and relatives were eagerly waiting for the results. Passing SLC is considered as crossing the iron gate and is seen as the most important examination in the school system. Students face a lot of pressure to do well, they spend a lot of anxious time anticipating the results, and when it is out- for those who do well, new freedom is found. The unfortunate ones who could not perform well due to various reasons are looked down upon as failures.

No matter what the results are, all students must receive proper attention and appreciation during this time, it is especially important for the ones who lagged behind in their performance. An encouraging pat is crucial for those who could not succeed. I hope we won’t have to hear news to students giving up  on their lives just because they failed in this particular exam. Life gives many opportunities and lessons after failure.

With this, many young people’s further study is determined by the results esp, which faculty and subject they opt for. Parents and friends largely influence during the decision making process beyond SLC. However, it is too early to conclude on the academic success and aptitude of a student just based on SLC results. Just at the time of this writing, one of my school teachers posted this status in facebook:

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The above status represent the concept of Book Smart vs. Street Smart. It is often true that the street smart students are ahead in other aspects of life than book smart students who do extremely well with the exams but who might not do well in the real life situations. However, it would be wrong idea to promote just one of them, in fact, combination of both book and street knowledge is desirable to become optimally functional.

For those of you who have passed SLC, my congratulations and I would like to encourage you to study Psychology if you are interested in psychological well-being, the invisible activities of the mind and their relationship with our behavior, here is a link for you:

https://sujenman.wordpress.com/2012/06/16/studying-psychology-after-slc/

 

#NepalQuake Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) Response


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Many compassionate people around the world have been touched by this disaster and suffering. They are starting to provide help in many ways. There are also initiatives being taken for mental health and psychosocial support response.

MHPSS.NET has opened up Nepal 2015 Earthquake Response Group  to share resources and information about the MHPSS response to the 25 April Disaster. If you are involved in the response or would like to contribute to resources, please join http://mhpss.net/groups/current-mhpss-emergency-responses/nepal-2015-earthquake-response/ Thanks to Ananda Galappatti (Sri Lanka), from The Good Practice Group and Wietse A. Tol for taking lead to organize and contributing valuable resources in this group.

HeartMind International in collaboration with TPO Nepal is preparing the response for both the short-term and long-term consequences of the earthquake on psychosocial well-being and mental health. They have made an appeal for donation for this effort: http://heartmindinternational.org/earthquake_response.html Dr. Brandon Kohrt have worked in Nepal for over a decade now and he is going to lead the response in order to ensure providing culturally appropriate and sustainable psychosocial services and interventions to earthquake affected families and children.

Several crowd funding have started online to support MHPSS activites in coming days.

Nepal Earthquake Relief Fund, Scotland UK: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nepal-earthquake-relief-fund-scotland-uk has been created by Claudia van Zuiden, solution-focused practitioner who have worked in Nepal before.

Disaster Relief and Psychological First Aid Near the Epicenter: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/kopila-nepal-earthquake-response–2 has been created by Bonnie Walker on behalf of Kopila Nepal.

Nepal Red Cross Society have mobilized 12 PFA volunteers in Kathmandu valley from today and plans to extend this service with more volunteers in other districts as well.

TPO Nepal has started its work in Sindhupalchowk from today, Dristy Gurung, a friend shared in her facebook status.

Mental Hospital, Lagankhel is organizing mobile clinic around the valley for the services.

Some information can be obtained at: http://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/nepal/protection and can be learned how different humanitarian actors and organizations are supporting at this time.

#NepalQuake After a Week


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A week ago on April 25, 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit Nepal causing the large scale damage and casualties. The most affected districts are Dhading, Gorkha, Rasuwa, Sindhupalchowk, Kavre, Nuwakot, Dolakha, Kathmandu, Lalitpur, Bhaktapur and Ramechhap. It is the biggest earthquake in Nepal since 1934 (1990 BS) 80 years ago. Over 6,200 people are known to have died as a result, and many others are injured, homeless and displaced. There is a humanitarian crisis and many people are still awaiting for relief. Aftershocks are still being felt, latest this afternoon, so, people are still fearful and worried about their safety. Many people have not only lost their lives, homes and safety. They have been also mentally affected and the consequences will unfold in the days to come, immediately or soon after.  People are resilient by nature and not everyone who experienced a disaster will develop mental health or psychological problems. However, MHPSS support can play crucial role in promoting psychological well-being and preventing adverse psychological impact/results. Psychological first aid along with relief support for basic needs (tarpaulins, blankets, food and utensils) can prevent the psychological damage of Nepali people.

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