Hateymalo (2010-16)


Public Resources in one place

md_cover-misssing-family-report-2009 2009 – Families of missing persons in Nepal: a study of their needs PDF: families-of-missing-persons-nepal-report

This assessment conducted by Simon Robbins was a stepping stone for the launch of Hateymalo program in Nepal.

hateymalo-brochure

2010 – Hateymalo: Accompanying families of the missing in Nepal. Piloted in Bardiya by Bhava Poudyal, Nepalese Psychologist and the team of ICRC colleagues which expanded to altogether 46 districts of Nepal in successive four phases.

 

2013 – Release of Don’t go so far documentary. Directed by Arnaud Galent.

2016 – Completion of the program & Final Dissemination Products (Reports , Documentaries & Photobook). In collaboration of Yubaraj Adhikari, Rupa Chaudhary, Bishnu Waiba, Juthi Ram Chaudhari, Kalu Ram Chaudhari, Purna Shova Maharjan, Bina Chaudhary, Sujen Man Maharjan and ICRC colleagues of various departments, Nepal Red Cross Society district chapters and local NGOs.

619971-hateymalo_accompaniment_report

hateymalo_accompaniment_report (ENGLISH),  hateymalo_accompaniment_report_in_nepali (NEPALI),

commemorating_the_missing (photobook)

 

Documentary:

 

Advertisements

Fathali on Psychology of Dictatorship & Democracy


vlcsnap-2016-06-05-22h44m29s211

Since 1950s, Nepal have gone through various revolutions and political changes at different points of time that had looked very promising, people hoped for positive changes in everyday lives of Nepali and betterment at all levels. Most recently, Nepal promulgated the new constitution after abolishing the monarchy over 8 years ago. It was welcomed as a historical milestone, the country moved from the political deadlock among monarchy, political parties and Maoists but wait, after all these years, what has happened to the lives of general Nepali who belong to middle-class and lower middle-class so far, the situation is getting tougher. The youth of Nepal is forced to migrate to gulf and other risk-prone countries for survival and to take care of their families. According to ILO, in fiscal year 2014, over  520,000 labour permits were issued to Nepalis for work abroad. High class people continue to hold back the power and dominate the politics. The country suffered devastating earthquakes last year, much of the rebuilding is yet to be started. There is a dissatisfaction among people over new constitution and the lack of right of women to pass on the citizenship to their children among many other issues. On June 14, the government issued online media directives which gives the power to government to crack down over dissenting voices. In democracy, voice is the most crucial aspect of political practice and public lives. Do we feel safe enough to go out and express ourselves at Basantapur Square without fear of police nearby located at Hanumandhoka? What if it reinforces fear to speak up? So, this brings up an important question: have we regressed back and moved even backwards than before? Are we once again heading back to times of dictatorship that our forefathers lived under??

I have found Iranian psychologist Fathali Moghaddam‘s theoretical concepts  useful to understand our political situation from psychological perspective. He has tried to explain the rise and fall of dictatorships through his springboard model in which he says that the context that lead to the rise of the dictator is more important the personality of the leader. In traditional psychology, the personality of the dictating leader is studied to understand the dictatorship but he prioritizes context and collective over individual processes to understand dictatorship and democracy.

vlcsnap-2016-06-05-22h59m28s245

Where does Nepal lie on this continuum between dictatorship and democracy???

Fathali also writes about the development of psychology in third-world countries like Nepal. His publications can be read here: http://fathalimoghaddam.com/?page_id=18

From Public Lecture about the book: http://www.iop.or.jp/Documents/1626/%5B125-138%5DJournal26_Moghaddam.pdf [125-138]Journal26_Moghaddam

Daniel Goleman on Compassion


Daniel Goleman, psychologist and award-winning author of Emotional Intelligence and other books on EI, challenges traditional measures of intelligence as a predictor of life success.

Daniel Goleman brought the notion of “EI” to prominence as an alternative to more traditional measures of IQ with his 1995 mega-best-seller Emotional Intelligence.

Since the publication of that book, conferences and academic institutes have sprung up dedicated to the idea. EI is taught in public schools, and corporate leaders have adopted it as a new way of thinking about success and leadership. EI, and one’s “EIQ,” can be an explanation of why some “average” people are incredibly successful, while “geniuses” sometimes fail to live up to their promise.

Emotional Intelligence, Goleman’s highly readable and wide-ranging exploration of the best research available by modern psychologists and educators, provides important insights into the true meaning of intelligence and the qualities it encompasses.”

David Perlman, San Francisco Chronicle

Philip Zimbardo on The Psychology of Evil


Philip Zimbardo was the leader of the notorious 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment — and an expert witness at Abu Ghraib. His book The Lucifer Effect explores the nature of evil; now, in his new work, he studies the nature of heroism.

Philip Zimbardo knows what evil looks like. After serving as an expert witness during the Abu Ghraib trials, he wrote The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. From Nazi comic books to the tactics of used-car salesmen, he explores a wealth of sources in trying to explain the psychology of evil.

A past president of the American Psychological Association and a professor emeritus at Stanford, Zimbardo retired in 2008 from lecturing, after 50 years of teaching his legendary introductory course in psychology. In addition to his work on evil and heroism, Zimbardo recently published The Time Paradox, exploring different cultural and personal perspectives on time.

Still well-known for his controversial Stanford Prison Experiment, Zimbardo in his new research looks at the psychology of heroism. He asks, “What pushes some people to become perpetrators of evil, while others act heroically on behalf of those in need?”

“Professor Zimbardo deserves heartfelt thanks for disclosing and illuminating the dark, hidden corners of the human soul.”

Václav Havel, former president of the Czech Republic

Psych Website: Psych Classics


Classics in the History of Psychology is an effort to make the full texts of a large number of historically significant public domain documents from the scholarly literature of psychology and allied disciplines available on the World Wide Web. There are now over 25 books and about 200 articles and chapters on-line. The site also contains links to over 200 relevant works posted at other sites.

The target audience is researchers, teachers, and students of the history of psychology, both for use in their courses on the history of psychology, and for the purposes of primary academic research. To assist undergraduate teaching, in particular, original introductory articles and commentaries, written by some of the leading historians of psychology in North America, have been attached to a number of the most important works.

The initial set of documents was chosen by the Editor of the project, Christopher D. Green of York University, in consultation with a number of other professional historians of psychology. Many of the subsequent documents were selected in response to the requests of the site’s users. See a more detailed history of the site below.

CHP would like to acknowledge the computer support of the Department of Psychology at York University, of the College of Education at Arizona State University, and the assistance of Dr. John Horan, who coordinated arrangements at ASU.

http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/

Enhanced by Zemanta