Daniel Goleman on Compassion


Daniel Goleman, psychologist and award-winning author of Emotional Intelligence and other books on EI, challenges traditional measures of intelligence as a predictor of life success.

Daniel Goleman brought the notion of “EI” to prominence as an alternative to more traditional measures of IQ with his 1995 mega-best-seller Emotional Intelligence.

Since the publication of that book, conferences and academic institutes have sprung up dedicated to the idea. EI is taught in public schools, and corporate leaders have adopted it as a new way of thinking about success and leadership. EI, and one’s “EIQ,” can be an explanation of why some “average” people are incredibly successful, while “geniuses” sometimes fail to live up to their promise.

Emotional Intelligence, Goleman’s highly readable and wide-ranging exploration of the best research available by modern psychologists and educators, provides important insights into the true meaning of intelligence and the qualities it encompasses.”

David Perlman, San Francisco Chronicle

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Martin Seligman on Positive Psychology


Martin Seligman is the founder of positive psychology, a field of study that examines healthy states, such as happiness, strength of character and optimism.

Martin Seligman founded the field of positive psychology in 2000, and has devoted his career since then to furthering the study of positive emotion, positive character traits, and positive institutions. It’s a fascinating field of study that had few empirical, scientific measures — traditional clinical psychology focusing more on the repair of unhappy states than the propagation and nurturing of happy ones. In his pioneering work, Seligman directs the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, developing clinical tools and training the next generation of positive psychologists.

His earlier work focused on perhaps the opposite state: learned helplessness, in which a person feels he or she is powerless to change a situation that is, in fact, changeable. Seligman is an often-cited authority in this field as well — in fact, his is the 13th most likely name to pop up in a general psych textbook. He was the leading consultant on a Consumer Reports study on long-term psychotherapy, and has developed several common pre-employment tests, including the Seligman Attributional Style Questionnaire (SASQ).

source: ted.com

How the Mind Works @ TED Conference


Watch out some of the very interesting talks given by psychologists and researchers at the TED conference. I will be posting some of the best ones, selected ones (my selections) throughout the next year, one each month.

At a conference about ideas, it’s important to step back and consider the engine that creates them: the human mind. How exactly does the brain — a three-pound snarl of electrochemically frantic nervous tissue — create inspired inventions, the feeling of hunger, the experience of beauty, or the sense of self — and how reliable is it?

Dan Dennett contemplates the mind as an ecosystem in which a new class of entities — memes — can compete, coexist, reproduce and flourish, and asks what sorts of nefarious things these entities might be up to. An enthusiastic Dan Gilbert presents his new research on the peculiar, counterintuitive — and perhaps a smidge deflating — secret to happiness. And Jeff Hawkins explains why a napkin-sized sheaf of cellular matter, wrinkled into a ball, will fundamentally change the direction of the computer industry.

Go to: http://www.ted.com/themes/how_the_mind_works.html

See More: http://www.ted.com (This is one site found in the internet you will like for sure. Let’s bet!)

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